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Friday, March 17, 2017

An Argentina Queen Must Give Up Her Passport

Give it back’ Netherlands MP orders Queen Maxima to give up her Argentine passport

QUEEN Maxima of the Netherlands has been ordered to give up her Argentine passport by a leading Dutch politician as voters head to the polls.


The glamorous royal was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and was granted joint citizenship before her 2002 wedding to King Willem-Alexander. 


But Sybrand Buma, the leader of the Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA), has demanded the Queen renounces her Argentinian nationality.
Mr Buma told NPO radio: “If it was up to me, everyone would have just one passport and that means the queen as well.
Queen Maxima of the Netherlands should renounce her Argentine passport, Sybrand Buma has declaredEPA/ AFP GETTY
Queen Maxima of the Netherlands should renounce her Argentine passport, Sybrand Buma has declared
“Dual nationality makes it difficult for people to integrate into Dutch society.
“If you want Dutch nationality… you are making a considered choice. It is more than a piece of paper. It is a choice which joins you to a country.” 
His outburst come as immigration takes centre-stage during today’s election with nationalist  and Prime Minister Mark Rutte dominating the issue.
 

Mr Buma has gained ground by adopting a tough line similar to Mr Rutte's on immigration, adding a focus on communal values and a touch of nationalism to tap voter concerns about Dutch identity.
He has also proposed introducing singing the national anthem in schools and mandatory community service. 
The Royal House is yet to comment on the matter, which coincided with the announcement of a state visit by the President of Argentina later this month. 
Argentina and the Netherlands work closely together with the European nation a principal investor and trading partner to Queen Maxima’s birthplace. 
Queen Maxima was born in was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina GETTY
Queen Maxima was born in was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina
The Queen was granted joint citizenship before her 2002 wedding to King Willem-AlexanderGETTY
The Queen was granted joint citizenship before her 2002 wedding to King Willem-Alexander
Up to 13 million voters will head to the polls today with 28 parties vying for power in the 
The election has centred on right-wing Mr Wilders and Mr Rutte but it is thought the CDA leader could still play a part in the new government. 
The fractured Dutch political landscape means a new coalition is inevitable with Mr Buma in with an outside chance of becoming prime minister, given other parties' refusal to work with Mr Wilders.

Opinion polls show Mr Buma trailing Mr Rutte's VVD by four percentage points and just one point behind nationalist Mr Wilders, on a rising trend. He could command around 20 seats in a fractured 150-seat parliament.
Mr Buma told Reuters all the pre-election talk had been that "this campaign would be about a rivalry between Rutte and Wilders”.
He added: “What's left of that dual? We are getting stronger every day and the chance that we are the biggest on election day is very real, and no one is expecting it."
Polls close at 9pm local time, with a formal announcement not set to be made until March 21
National broadcaster NOS said that by 9.30am GMT, turnout was at 15 per cent, two per cent ahead of the previous parliamentary election in 2012.
With as many as four out of 10 voters undecided a day before voting, there is a tight margin of just four per cent between the leading candidates.